The cost of good security is a fraction of the cost of damages that usually result from a single successful compromise. When you choose the inexpensive security vendor, you are getting what you pay for. If you are looking for a check in the box instead of good security services, then maybe you should re-evaluate your thinking because you might be creating a negative Return on Investment.

Usually a check in the box means that you comply with some sort of regulation, but that doesn’t mean that you are actually secure. As a matter of fact, almost all networks that contain credit card information and are successfully hacked are PCI compliant (a real example). That goes to show that compliance doesn’t protect you from hackers, it only protects you from auditors and the fines that they can impose. Whats more is that those fines are only a small fraction of the cost of the damages that can be caused by a single successful hack.

When a computer system is hacked, the hacker doesn’t stop at one computer. Standard hacker practice is to perform Distributed Metastasis and propagate the penetration throughout the rest of the network. This means that within a matter of minutes the hacker will likely have control over the most or all of the critical aspects of your IT infrastructure and will also have access to your sensitive data. At that point you’ve lost the battle… but you were compliant, you paid for the scan and now you’ve got a negative Return on that Investment (“ROI”).

So what are the damages? Its actually impossible to determine the exact cost in damages that result from a single successful hack because its impossible to be certain of the full extent of the compromise. Never the less, here are some of the areas to consider when attempting to calculate damages:

  • Man hours to identify every compromised device
  • Man hours to reinstall and configure every device
  • Man hours required to check source code for malicious alterations
  • Man hours to monitor network traffic for hits of malicious traffic or access
  • Man hours to educate customers
  • Penalties and fines.
  • The cost of downtime
  • The cost of lost customers
  • The cost of a damaged reputation
  • etc.

(The damages could *easily* cost well over half a million dollars on a network of only ~50 or so computers. )

Now lets consider the Return on Investment of *good* security. An Advanced Penetration Test against a small IT Infrastructure (~50 computers in total) might cost something around $16,000.00-$25,000 for an 80 hour project. If that service is delivered by a quality vendor then it will enable you to identify and eliminate your risks before they are exploited by a malicious hacker. The ROI of the quality service would be equal to the cost in damages of a single successful compromise minus the cost of the services. Not to mention you’d be complaint too…

(Note: the actual cost of services varies quite a bit depending on what needs to be done, etc.)

So why is it that some vendors will do this work for $500.00 or $2,000.00, etc? Its simple, they are not delivering the same quality service as the quality vendor. When you pay $500.00 for a vulnerability scan you are paying for something that you could do yourself for free (go download nessus). Never the less, when you pay $500.00 you are really only paying for about 5 minutes of manual labor, the rest of the work is automated and done by the tools. (If you broke that down to an hourly rate you’d be paying something like $6000.00 an hour since you’re paying $500.00 per 5 minutes). In the end you might end up with a check in your compliance box but you’ll still just as vulnerable as you were in the beginning.

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