penetration test

Netragard’s Hacker Interface Device (HID).

We (Netragard) recently completed an engagement for a client with a rather restricted scope. The scope included a single IP address bound to a firewall that offered no services what so ever. It also excluded the use of social attack vectors based on social networks, telephone, or email and disallowed any physical access to the campus and surrounding areas. With all of these limitations in place, we were tasked with penetrating into the network from the perspective of a remote threat, and succeeded.

The first method of attack that people might think of when faced with a challenge like this is the use of the traditional autorun malware on a USB stick. Just mail a bunch of sticks to different people within the target company and wait for someone to plug it in; when they do its game over, they’re infected. That trick worked great back in the day but not so much any more. The first issue is that most people are well aware of the USB stick threat due to the many published articles about the subject. The second is that more and more companies are pushing out group policies that disable the autorun feature in Windows systems. Those two things don’t eliminate the USB stick threat, but they certainly have a significant impact on its level of success and we wanted something more reliable.

Enter PRION, the evil HID.

 

A prion is an infectious agent composed of a protein in a misfolded form. In our case the prion isn’t composed of proteins but instead is composed of electronics which include a teensy microcontroller, a micro USB hub (small one from RadioShack), a mini USB cable (we […]

Netragard Signage Snatching

Recently Netragard has had a few discussions with owners and operators of sports arenas, with the purpose of identifying methods in which a malicious hacker could potentially disrupt a sporting event, concert, or other large scale and highly visible event.

During the course of the these conversations, the topic of discussion shifted from network exploitation to social engineering, with a focus on compromise of the digital signage systems.  Until recently, even I hadn’t thought about how extensively network controlled signage systems are used in facilities like casinos, sports arenas, airports, and roadside billboards.  That is, until our most recent casino project.

Netragard recently completed a Network Penetration Test and Social Engineering Test for a large west coast casino, with spectacular results. Not only were our engineers able to gain the keys to the kingdom, they were also able to gain access to the systems that had supervisory control for every single digital sign in the facility.  Some people may think to themselves, “ok, what’s the big deal with that?”.  The answer is simple:  Customer perception and corporate image.

Before I continue on, let me provide some background; Early in 2008, there were two incidents in California where two on-highway digital billboards were compromised, and their displays changed from the intended display.  While both of these incidents were small pranks in comparison to what they could have done, the effect was remembered by those who drove by and saw the signs.  (Example A, Example B)

Another recent billboard hack in Moscow, Russia, wasn’t as polite as the pranksters in California.  A hacker was able to gain control of a billboard in downtown Moscow (worth noting, Moscow is the 7th largest city in the world), and after subsequently gaining access, […]

The Human Vulnerability

It seems to us that one of the biggest threats that businesses face today is socially augmented malware attacks. These attacks have an extremely high degree of success because they target and exploit the human element. Specifically, it doesn’t matter how many protective technology layers you have in place if the people that you’ve hired are putting you at risk, and they are. Case in point, the “here you have” worm that propagates predominantly via e-mail and promises the recipient access to PDF documents or even pornographic material. This specific worm compromised major organizations such as NASA, ABC/Disney, Comcast, Google Coca-Cola, etc. How much money do you think that those companies spend on security technology over a one-year period? How much good did it do at protecting them from the risks introduced by the human element? (Hint: none) Here at Netragard we have a unique perspective on the issue of malware attacks because we offer pseudo-malware testing services. Our pseudo-malware module, when activated, authorizes us to test our clients with highly customized, safe, controlled, and homegrown pseudo-malware variants. To the best of our knowledge we are the only penetration testing company to offer such a service (and no, we’re not talking about the meterpreter). Attack delivery usually involves attaching our pseudo-malware to emails or binding the pseudo-malware to PDF documents or other similar file types. In all cases we make it a point to pack (or crypt) our pseudo-malware so that it doesn’t get detected by antivirus technology (see this blog entry on bypassing antivirus). Once the malware is activated, it establishes an encrypted connection back to our offices and provides us with full control over the […]

Professional Script Kiddies vs Real Talent

The Good Guys in the security world are no different from the Bad Guys; most of them are nothing more than glorified Script Kidies. The fact of the matter is that if you took all of the self-proclaimed hackers in the world and you subjected them to a litmus test, very few would pass as acutal hackers.This is true for both sides of the so called Black and White hat coin. In the Black Hat world, you have script-kids who download programs that are written by other people then use those programs to “hack” into networks. The White Hat’s do the exact same thing; only they buy the expensive tools instead of downloading them for free. Or maybe they’re actually paying for the pretty GUI, who knows?What is pitiable is that in just about all cases these script kiddies have no idea what the programs actually do. Sometimes that’s because they don’t bother to look at the code, but most of the time its because they just can’t understand it. If you think about it that that is scary. Do you really want to work with a security company that launches attacks against your network with tools that they do not fully understand? I sure wouldn’t.This is part of the reason why I feel that it is so important for any professional security services provider to maintain an active research team. I’m not talking about doing market research and pretending that its security research like so many security companies do. I’m talking about doing actual vulnerability research and exploit development to help educate people about risks for the purposes of defense. After all, if a […]

Social Engineering — Its Nothing New

With all the recent hype about Social Engineering we figured that we’d chime in and tell people what’s really going on. The fact is that Social Engineering is nothing more than a Confidence Trick being carried out by a Con Artist. The only difference between the term Social Engineering and Confidence Trick is that Social Engineering is predominately used with relation to technology. So what is it really? Social Engineering is the act of exploiting a person’s natural tendency to trust another person or entity. Because the vulnerability exists within people, there is no truly effective method for remediation. That is not to say that you cannot protect your sensitive data, but it is to say that you cannot always prevent your people or even yourself from being successfully conned. The core ingredients required to perform a successful confidence trick are no different today then they were before the advent of the Internet. The con artist must have the victim’s trust, and then trick the victim into performing an action or divulging information. The Internet certainly didn’t create the risk but it does make it easier for the threat to align with the risk. Before the advent of the Internet the con artist (threat) needed to contact the victim (risk) via telephone, in person, via snail mail, etc. Once contact was made a good story needed to be put into place and the victim’s trust needed to be earned. That process could take months or even years and even then success isn’t guaranteed. The advent of the Internet provided the threat with many more avenues’ through which it could successfully align with the risk. Specifically, the Internet enables the threat to […]

ROI of good security.

The cost of good security is a fraction of the cost of damages that usually result from a single successful compromise. When you choose the inexpensive security vendor, you are getting what you pay for. If you are looking for a check in the box instead of good security services, then maybe you should re-evaluate your thinking because you might be creating a negative Return on Investment.Usually a check in the box means that you comply with some sort of regulation, but that doesn’t mean that you are actually secure. As a matter of fact, almost all networks that contain credit card information and are successfully hacked are PCI compliant (a real example). That goes to show that compliance doesn’t protect you from hackers, it only protects you from auditors and the fines that they can impose. Whats more is that those fines are only a small fraction of the cost of the damages that can be caused by a single successful hack.When a computer system is hacked, the hacker doesn’t stop at one computer. Standard hacker practice is to perform Distributed Metastasis and propagate the penetration throughout the rest of the network. This means that within a matter of minutes the hacker will likely have control over the most or all of the critical aspects of your IT infrastructure and will also have access to your sensitive data. At that point you’ve lost the battle… but you were compliant, you paid for the scan and now you’ve got a negative Return on that Investment (“ROI”).So what are the damages? Its actually impossible to determine the exact cost in damages that result from […]

Need a Penetration Testing Quote?Get A Quote