Selling zero-day’s doesn’t increase your risk, here’s why.

The zero-day exploit market is secretive. People as a whole tend to fear what they don’t understand and substitute fact with speculation.  While very few facts about the zero-day exploit market are publicly available, there are many facts about zero-days that are available.  When those facts are studied it becomes clear that the legitimate zero-day exploit market presents an immeasurably small risk (if any), especially when viewed in contrast with known risks.

Many news outlets, technical reporters, freedom of information supporters, and even security experts have used the zero-day exploit market to generate Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).  While the concept of a zero-day exploit seems ominous reality is actually far less menacing.  People should be significantly more worried about vulnerabilities that exist in public domain than those that are zero-day.  The misrepresentations about the zero-day market create a dangerous distraction from the very real issues at hand.

One of the most common misrepresentations is that the zero-day exploit market plays a major role in the creation of malware and malware’s ability to spread.  Not only is this categorically untrue but the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIRv11) provides clear statistics that show that malware almost never uses zero-day exploits.  According to SIRv11, less than 6% of malware infections are actually attributed to the exploitation of general vulnerabilities.  Of those successful infections nearly all target known and not zero-day vulnerabilities.

Malware targets and exploits gullibility far more frequently than technical vulnerabilities.  The “ILOVEYOU” worm is a prime example.  The worm would email its self to a victim with a subject of “I LOVE YOU” and an attachment titled “LOVE-LETTER-FOR-YOU.txt.vbs”. The attachment was actually a copy of the worm.  When a person attempted to read the attachment they would inadvertently […]

Exploit Acquisition Program – More Details

The recent news on Forbes about our Exploit Acquisition Program has generated a lot of interesting speculative controversy and curiosity. As a result, I’ve decided to take the time to follow up with this blog entry. Here I’ll make a best effort to explain what the Exploit Acquisition Program is, why we decided to launch the program, and how the program works. What it is:The Exploit Acquisition Program (“EAP”) officially started in May of 1999 and is currently being run by Netragard, LLC. EAP specifically designed to acquire “actionable research” in the form of working exploits from the security community. The Exploit Acquisition Program is different than other programs because participants receive significantly higher pay for their work and in most cases the exploits never become public knowledge.The exploits that are acquired via the EAP are sold directly to specific US based clients that have a unique and justifiable need for such technologies. At no point does Netragard sell or otherwise export acquired exploits to any foreign entities. Nor do we disclose any information about our buyers or about participating researchers. Why did we start the EAP?Netragard launched the EAP to give security researchers the opportunity to receive fair value for their research product. Our bidding prices start at or around $15,000 per exploit. That price is affected by many different variables. How does the EAP Work?The EAP works as follows:Researcher contacts Netragard.Researcher and Netragard execute a Mutual Nondisclosure Agreement.Researcher provides a verifiable form of identification to Netragard.Researcher fills out an Exploit Acquisition Form (“EAF”).Netragard works with the buyer to determine exploit value based on the information provided in the EAF.Researcher accepts or rejects the price. Note: If […]

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