Exploits

How we breach retail networks…

 

Audio Version:

We recently delivered an Advanced Persistent Threat  (APT) Penetration Test to one of our customers. People who know us know that when we say APT we’re not just using buzz words.  Our APT services maintain a 98% success rate at compromise while our unrestricted methodology maintains a 100% success at compromise to date.  (In fact we offer a challenge to back up our stats.  If we don’t penetrate with our unrestricted methodology then your test is free. If we do get in then you pay us an extra 10%.)  Lets begin the story about a large retail customer that wanted our APT services.

When we deliver covert engagements we don’t use the everyday and largely ineffective low and slow methodology.  Instead, we use a realistic offensive methodology that incorporates distributed scanning, the use of custom tools, zero-day malware (RADON) among other things.  We call this methodology Real Time Dynamic Testing™ because it’s delivered in real time and is dynamic.  At the core of our methodology are components normally reserved for vulnerability research and exploit development.  Needless to say, our methodology has teeth.

Our customer (the target) wanted a single /23 attacked during the engagement. The first thing that we did was to perform reconnaissance against the /23 so that we knew what we were up against.  Reconnaissance in this case involved distributed scanning and revealed a large number of http and https services running on 149 live targets.  The majority of the pages were uninteresting and provided static content while a few provided dynamic content.

While evaluating the dynamic pages we came across one that was called Make Boss. The application was appeared to be custom built for the purpose of managing software builds. What really snagged our attention was that […]

Whistleblower Series – The real problem with China isn’t China, its you.

Terms like China, APT and Zero-Day are synonymous with Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).  The trouble is that, in our opinion anyway, these terms and respective news articles detract from the actual problem.  For example, in 2011 only 0.12% of compromises were attributed to zero-day exploitation and 99.88% were attributed to known vulnerabilities.  Yet, despite this fact the media continued to write about the zero-day threat as if it was a matter of urgency.  What they really should have been writing about is that the majority of people aren’t protecting their networks properly.  After all, if 99.88% of all compromises were the result of the exploitation of known vulnerabilities then someone must not have been doing their job. Moreover, if people are unable to protect their networks from the known threat then how are they ever going to defend against the unknown?

All of the recent press about China and their Advanced Persistent Threat is the same, it detracts from the real problem.  More clearly, the problem isn’t China, Anonymous, LulzSec, or any other FUD ridden buzzword.  The problem is that networks are not being maintained properly from a security perspective and so threats are aligning with risks to successfully affect penetration.  A large part of the reason why these networks are such soft targets is because  their maintainers are sold a false sense of security from both the services and technology perspective.

In this article we’ll show you how easy it was for us to hack into a sensitive government network that was guarded by industry technologies and testing best practices.  Our techniques deliberately mimicked those used by China.  You’ll notice that the  techniques aren’t particularly advanced (despite the fact that the press calls them Advanced) and in fact are based […]

Selling zero-day’s doesn’t increase your risk, here’s why.

The zero-day exploit market is secretive. People as a whole tend to fear what they don’t understand and substitute fact with speculation.  While very few facts about the zero-day exploit market are publicly available, there are many facts about zero-days that are available.  When those facts are studied it becomes clear that the legitimate zero-day exploit market presents an immeasurably small risk (if any), especially when viewed in contrast with known risks.

Many news outlets, technical reporters, freedom of information supporters, and even security experts have used the zero-day exploit market to generate Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).  While the concept of a zero-day exploit seems ominous reality is actually far less menacing.  People should be significantly more worried about vulnerabilities that exist in public domain than those that are zero-day.  The misrepresentations about the zero-day market create a dangerous distraction from the very real issues at hand.

One of the most common misrepresentations is that the zero-day exploit market plays a major role in the creation of malware and malware’s ability to spread.  Not only is this categorically untrue but the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIRv11) provides clear statistics that show that malware almost never uses zero-day exploits.  According to SIRv11, less than 6% of malware infections are actually attributed to the exploitation of general vulnerabilities.  Of those successful infections nearly all target known and not zero-day vulnerabilities.

Malware targets and exploits gullibility far more frequently than technical vulnerabilities.  The “ILOVEYOU” worm is a prime example.  The worm would email its self to a victim with a subject of “I LOVE YOU” and an attachment titled “LOVE-LETTER-FOR-YOU.txt.vbs”. The attachment was actually a copy of the worm.  When a person attempted to read the attachment they would inadvertently run […]

Thank You Anonymous

We (Netragard) have been meaning to say Thank You to Anonymous for a long time now. With that said, Netragard does not condone the actions of Anonymous, nor the damage they have caused.   What Anonymous has demonstrated, and continues to demonstrate, is just how poorly most network infrastructures are managed from a security perspective (globally, not just within the USA).  People need to wake up.

If you take the time to look at most of the hacks done by Anonymous, you’ll find that their primary points of entry are really quite basic.  They often involve the exploitation of simple SQL Injection vulnerabilities, poorly configured servers, or even basic Social Engineering.  We’re not convinced that Anonymous is talentless; we just think that they haven’t had to use their talent because the targets are so soft.

What Anonymous has really exposed here are issues with the security industry as a whole and with the customers that are being serviced. Many of Anonymous’s victims use third party Penetration Testing vendors and nightly Vulnerability Scanning services.  Many of them even use “best of breed” Intrusion Prevention Systems and “state of the art” firewalls.  Despite this, Anonymous still succeeds at Penetration with relative ease, without detection and by exploiting easy to identify vulnerabilities.  So the question becomes, why is Anonymous so successful?

Part of the reason is that regulatory requirements like PCI DSS 11.3 (and others) shift businesses from wanting Penetration Tests for security reasons to needing Penetration Tests in order to satisfy regulatory requirements.  What is problematic is that most regulatory requirements provide no minimum quality standard for Penetration Testing.  They also provide no incentive for quality testing.  As a result, anyone with an automated vulnerability scanner and the ability to […]

Netragard on Exploit Brokering

Historically ethical researchers would provide their findings free of charge to software vendors for little more than a mention.  In some cases vendors would react and threaten legal action citing violations of poorly written copyright laws that include but are not limited to the DMCA.  To put this into perspective, this is akin to threatening legal action against a driver for pointing out that the breaks on a school bus are about to fail.

This unfriendliness (among various other things) caused some researchers to withdraw from the practice of full disclosure. Why risk doing a vendor the favor of free work when the vendor might try to sue you?

Organizations like CERT help to reduce or eliminate the risk to security researchers who wish to disclose vulnerabilities.  These organizations work as mediators between the researchers and the vendors to ensure safety for both parties.  Other organizations like iDefense and ZDI also work as middlemen but unlike CERT earn a profit from the vulnerabilities that they purchase. While they may pay a security researcher an average of $500-$5000 per vulnerability, they charge their customers significantly more for their early warning services.  Its also unclear (to us anyway) how quickly they notify vendors of the vulnerabilities that they buy.

The next level of exploit buyers are the brokers.  Exploit brokers may cater to one or more of three markets that include National, International, or Black.  While Netragard’s program only sells to National buyers, companies like VUPEN sell internationally.  Also unlike VUPEN, Netragard will sell exploits to software vendors willing to engage in an exclusive sale.   Netragard’s Exploit Acquisition Program was created to provide ethical researchers with the ability to receive fair pay for their hard work; it was not created […]

Hacking your car for fun and profit.

Our CEO (Adriel Desautels) recently spoke at the Green Hills Software Elite Users Technology Summit regarding automotive hacking. During his presentation there were a series of reporters taking photographs, recording audio, etc.   Of all of the articles that came out, one in particular caught our eye.  We made the front page of “Elektronik iNorden” which is a Swedish technology magazine that focuses on hardware and embedded systems.

You can see the full article here but you’ll probably want to translate:

http://www.webbkampanj.com/ein/1011/?page=1&mode=50&noConflict=1

 

What really surprised us during the presentation was how many people were in disbelief about the level of risk associated with cars built after 2007.
 For example, it really isn’t all that hard to program a car to kill the driver.  In fact, its far too easy due to the overall lack of security cars today.
Think of a car as an IT Infrastructure.  All of the servers in the infrastructure are critical systems that control things like breaks, seat belts, door locks, engine timing, airbags, lights, the radio, the dashboard display, etc.  Instead of these systems being plugged into a switched network they are plugged into a hub network lacking any segmentation with no security to speak of.  The only real difference between the car network and your business network is that the car doesn’t have an Internet connection.

Enter the Chevrolet Volt, the first car to have its own IP address. Granted we don’t yet know how the Volt’s IP address will be protected.  We don’t know if each car will have a public IP address or if the cars will be connected to a private network controlled by Chevy (or someone else).  What we do know is that the car will be able to reach out […]

Bypassing Antivirus to Hack You

Many people assume that running antivirus software will protect them from malware (viruses, worms, trojans, etc), but in reality the software is only partially effective. This is true because antivirus software can only detect malware that it knows to look for. Anything that doesn’t match a known malware pattern will pass as a clean and trusted file.Antivirus technologies use virus definition files to define known malware patterns. Those patterns are derived from real world malware variants that are captured in the wild. It is relatively easy to bypass most antivirus technologies by creating new malware or modifying existing malware so that it does not contain any identifiable patterns.One of the modules that our customers can activate when purchasing Penetration Testing services from us, is the Pseudo Malware module. As far as we know, we are one of the few Penetration Testing companies to actually use Pseudo Malware during testing. This module enables our customers to test how effective their defenses are against real world malware threats but in a safe and controllable way. Our choice of Pseudo Malware depends on the target that we intend to penetrate and the number of systems that we intend to compromise. Sometimes we’ll use Pseudo Malware that doesn’t automatically propagate and other times we’ll use auto-propagation. We should mention that this Pseudo Malware is only “Pseudo” because we don’t do anything harmful with it and we use it ethically. The fact of the matter is that this Pseudo Malware is very real and very capable technology.Once we’ve determined what Pseudo Malware variant to go with, we need to augment the Pseudo Malware so that it is not detectable by antivirus […]

Exploit Acquisition Program – More Details

The recent news on Forbes about our Exploit Acquisition Program has generated a lot of interesting speculative controversy and curiosity. As a result, I’ve decided to take the time to follow up with this blog entry. Here I’ll make a best effort to explain what the Exploit Acquisition Program is, why we decided to launch the program, and how the program works. What it is:The Exploit Acquisition Program (“EAP”) officially started in May of 1999 and is currently being run by Netragard, LLC. EAP specifically designed to acquire “actionable research” in the form of working exploits from the security community. The Exploit Acquisition Program is different than other programs because participants receive significantly higher pay for their work and in most cases the exploits never become public knowledge.The exploits that are acquired via the EAP are sold directly to specific US based clients that have a unique and justifiable need for such technologies. At no point does Netragard sell or otherwise export acquired exploits to any foreign entities. Nor do we disclose any information about our buyers or about participating researchers. Why did we start the EAP?Netragard launched the EAP to give security researchers the opportunity to receive fair value for their research product. Our bidding prices start at or around $15,000 per exploit. That price is affected by many different variables. How does the EAP Work?The EAP works as follows:Researcher contacts Netragard.Researcher and Netragard execute a Mutual Nondisclosure Agreement.Researcher provides a verifiable form of identification to Netragard.Researcher fills out an Exploit Acquisition Form (“EAF”).Netragard works with the buyer to determine exploit value based on the information provided in the EAF.Researcher accepts or rejects the price. Note: If rejected, […]