What you don’t know about compliance…

People are always mystified by how hackers break into major networks like Target, Hannaford, Sony, (government networks included), etc.  They always seem to be under the impression that hackers have some elite level of skill.  The truth is that it doesn’t take any skill to break into most networks because they aren’t actually protected. Most network owners don’t care about security because they don’t perceive the threat as real.  They suffer from the “it won’t ever happen to me” syndrome. As a genuine penetration testing company we take on dozens of new opportunities per month.  Amazingly, roughly 80% of businesses that request services don’t want quality security testing, they want a simple check in the compliance box. They perceive quality security testing as an unnecessary and costly annoyance that stands in the way of new revenue.  These businesses test because they are required to, not because they want to.  These requirements stem from partners, customers, and regulations that include but are not limited to PCI-DSS, HIPAA, etc. Unfortunately these requirements make the problem worse rather than better.  For example, while PCI requires merchants to receive penetration tests it completely fails [...]

Don’t become a Target

All of the recent news about Target, Neiman Marcus, and other businesses being hacked might be a surprise to many but it’s no surprise to us. Truth is that practice of security has devolved into a political image focused designed satisfy technically inept regulatory requirements that do little or nothing to protect critical business assets. What’s worse is that many security companies are capitalizing on this devolution rather than providing effective solutions in the spirit of good security. This is especially true with regards to the penetration testing industry. We all know that money is the lifeblood of business and that a failure to meet regulatory requirements threatens that lifeblood. After all, when a business is not in compliance it runs the risk of being fined or not being allowed to operate. In addition the imaginary expenses associated with true security are often perceived as a financial burden (another lifeblood threat). This is usually because the RoI of good security is only apparent when a would-be compromise is prevented. Too many business managers are of the opinion that "it won't happen to us" until they become a target and it [...]

How much should you spend on penetration testing services?

The right way versus the wrong way to price a penetration test The most common question asked is "how much will it cost for you to deliver a penetration test to us?". Rather than responding to those questions each time with the same exact answer, we thought it might be best to write a detailed yet simple blog entry on the subject. We suspect that you'll have no trouble understanding the pricing methods described herein because they're common sense. The price for a genuine penetration test is based on the amount of human work required to successfully deliver the test. The amount of human work depends on the complexity of the infrastructure to be tested.  The infrastructure's complexity depends on the configuration of each individual network connected device. A network connected device is anything including but not limited to servers, switches, firewalls, telephones, etc. Each unique network connected device provides different services that serve different purposes.  Because each service is different each service requires different amounts of time to test correctly. It is for this exact reason that a genuine penetration test cannot be priced based on the number of [...]

Whistleblower Series – The real problem with China isn’t China, its you.

Terms like China, APT and Zero-Day are synonymous with Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).  The trouble is that, in our opinion anyway, these terms and respective news articles detract from the actual problem.  For example, in 2011 only 0.12% of compromises were attributed to zero-day exploitation and 99.88% were attributed to known vulnerabilities.  Yet, despite this fact the media continued to write about the zero-day threat as if it was a matter of urgency.  What they really should have been writing about is that the majority of people aren't protecting their networks properly.  After all, if 99.88% of all compromises were the result of the exploitation of known vulnerabilities then someone must not have been doing their job. Moreover, if people are unable to protect their networks from the known threat then how are they ever going to defend against the unknown? All of the recent press about China and their Advanced Persistent Threat is the same, it detracts from the real problem.  More clearly, the problem isn't China, Anonymous, LulzSec, or any other FUD ridden buzzword.  The problem is that networks are not being maintained properly from a security [...]

How to find a genuine Penetration Testing firm

There's been a theme of dishonesty and thievery in the Penetration Testing industry for as long as we can remember.  Much in the same way that merchants sold "snake-oil" as a cure-all for what ails you, Penetration Testing vendors sell one type of service and brand it as another thus providing little more than a false sense of security.  They do this by exploiting their customers lack of expertise about penetration testing and make off like bandits.  We’re going to change the game; we’re going to tell you the truth. Last week we had a new financial services customer approach us.  They’d already received three proposals from three other well-known and trusted Penetration Testing vendors. When we began to scope their engagement we quickly realized that the IP addresses that they’d been providing were wrong.  Instead of belonging to them they belonged an e-commerce business that sold beer-making products!  How did we catch this when the other vendors didn’t?  Simple, we actually take the time to scope our engagements carefully because we deliver genuine Penetration Testing services. Most other penetration testing vendors do what is called count based pricing which [...]

83% of businesses have no established security plan (but they’ve got Kool-Aid)

I (Adriel) read an article published by Charles Cooper of c|net regarding small businesses and their apparent near total lack of awareness with regards to security.  The article claims that 77% of small- and medium-sized businesses think that they are secure yet 83% of those businesses have no established security plan.  These numbers were based on a survey of 1,015 small- and medium-sized businesses that was carried out by the National Cyber Security Alliance and Symantec. These numbers don't surprise me at all and, in fact, I think that this false sense of security is an epidemic across businesses of all sizes, not just small-to-medium.  The question that people haven't asked is why does this false sense of security exist in such a profound way? Are people really ok with feeling safe when they are in fact vulnerable?  Perhaps they are being lied to and are drinking the Kool-Aid... What I mean is this.  How many software vendors market their products as secure only to have someone identify all sorts of critical vulnerabilities in it later?  Have you ever heard a software vendor suggest that their software might not be highly secure?  Not only is the suggestion that all software [...]

Netragard’s Badge of Honor (Thank you McAfee)

Here at Netragard We Protect You From People Like Us™ and we mean it.  We don’t just run automated scans, massage the output, and draft you a report that makes you feel good.  That's what many companies do.  Instead, we "hack" you with a methodology that is driven by hands on research, designed to create realistic and elevated levels of threat.  Don’t take our word for it though; McAfee has helped us prove it to the world. Through their Threat Intelligence service, McAfee Labs listed Netragard as a “High Risk” due to the level of threat that we produced during a recent engagement.  Specifically, we were using a beta variant of our custom Meterbreter malware (not to be confused with Metasploit’s Meterpreter) during an Advanced Penetration Testing engagement.  The beta malware was identified and submitted to McAfee via our customers Incident Response process.  The result was that McAfee listed Netragard as a “High Risk”, which caught our attention (and our customers attention) pretty quickly. McAfee was absolutely right; we are “High Risk”, or more appropriately, "High Threat", which in our opinion is critically important when delivering quality Penetration [...]

Quality Penetration Testing by Netragard

The purpose of Penetration Testing is to identify the presence of points where an external entity can make its way into or through a protected entity. Penetration Testing is not unique to IT security and is used across a wide variety of different industries.  For example, Penetration Tests are used to assess the effectiveness of body armor.  This is done by exposing the armor to different munitions that represent the real threat. If a projectile penetrates the armor then the armor is revised and improved upon until it can endure the threat. Network Penetration Testing is a class of Penetration Testing that applies to Information Technology. The purpose of Network Penetration Testing is to identify the presence of points where a threat (defined by the hacker) can align with existing risks to achieve penetration. The accurate identification of these points allows for remediation. Successful penetration by a malicious hacker can result in the compromise of data with respect to Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability (“CIA”).  In order to ensure that a Network Penetration Test provides an accurate measure of risk (risk = probability x impact) the test must be delivered at [...]

Netragard Challenges your PCI Compliance

The purpose of legitimate Network Penetration Testing is to positively identify risks in a targeted IT Infrastructure before those risks are identified and exploited by malicious hackers. This enables the IT managers to remediate against those risks before they become an issue. To accomplish this the Penetration Test must be driven by people with at least the same degree of skill and persistence as the threat (defined by the malicious hacker). If the Penetration Test is delivered with a skill set that is less than that of the real threat then the test will likely be ineffective. This would be akin to testing the effectiveness a bullet-proof vest with a squirt gun. Unfortunately most penetration tests don't test at realistic threat levels. This is especially true with regards to PCI based penetration tests. Most PCI based penetration testing companies do the bare minimum required to satisfy PCI requirement 11.3. This is problematic because it results in businesses passing their PCI penetration tests when they should have failed and it promotes a false sense of security. The truth is that most businesses that pass their annual PCI audits are still relatively easy [...]

Netragard’s thoughts on Pentesting IPv6 vs IPv4

We’ve heard a bit of “noise” about how IPv6 may impact network penetration testing and how networks may or may not be more secure because of IPv6.  Lets be clear, anyone telling you that IPv6 makes penetration testing harder doesn’t understand the first thing about real penetration testing. Whats the point of IPv6? IPv6 was designed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (“IETF”) to address the issue of IPv4 address space exhaustion.  IPv6 uses a 128-bit address space while IPv4 is only 32 bits.  This means that there are 2128 possible addresses with IPv6, which is far more than the 232 addresses available with IPv4.  This means that there are going to be many more potential targets for a penetration tester to focus on when IPv6 becomes the norm. What about increased security with IPv6? The IPv6 specification mandates support for the Internet Protocol Security (“IPSec”) protocol suite, which is designed to secure IP communications by authenticating and encrypting each IP Packet. IPSec operates at the Internet Layer of the Internet Protocol suite and so differs from other security systems like the Secure Socket Layer, which operates at the application [...]