How much should you spend on penetration testing services?

The most common question asked is “how much will it cost for you to deliver a penetration test to us?”. Rather than responding to those questions each time with the same exact answer, we thought it might be best to write a detailed yet simple blog entry on the subject. We suspect that you’ll have no trouble understanding the pricing methods described herein because they’re common sense. The price for a genuine penetration test is based on the amount of human work required to successfully deliver the test.

The amount of human work depends on the complexity of the infrastructure to be tested.  The infrastructure’s complexity depends on the configuration of each individual network connected device. A network connected device is anything including but not limited to servers, switches, firewalls, telephones, etc. Each unique network connected device provides different services that serve different purposes.  Because each service is different each service requires different amounts of time to test correctly. It is for this exact reason that a genuine penetration test cannot be priced based on the number of IP addresses or number of devices.  It does not make sense to charge $X per IP address when each IP address requires a different amount of work to test properly. Instead, the only correct way to price a genuine penetration test is to assess the time requirements and from there derive workload.

At Netragard the workload for an engagement is based on science and not an arbitrary price per IP. Our pricing is based on something that we call Time Per Parameter (TPP).  The TPP is the amount of time that a Netragard researcher will spend testing each parameter. A parameter is either a service being provided by […]

Whistleblower Series – Don’t be naive, take the time to read and understand the proposal.

In our last whistleblower article, we showed that the vast majority of Penetration Testing vendors don’t actually sell Penetration Tests. We did this by deconstructing pricing methodologies and combining the results with common sense. We’re about to do the same thing to the industry average Penetration Testing proposal. Only this time we’re not just going to be critical of the vendors, we’re also going to be critical of the buyers.

A proposal is a written offer from seller to buyer that defines what services or products are being sold. When you take your car to the dealer, the dealer gives you a quote for work (the proposal). That proposal always contains an itemized list for parts and labor as well as details on what work needs to be done. That is the right way to build a service-based proposal.

The industry average Network Penetration Testing proposal fails to define the services being offered. Remember, the word ‘define’ means the exact meaning of something. When we read a network penetration testing proposal and we have to ask ourselves “so what is this vendor going to do for us?” then the proposal has clearly failed to define services.

For example, just recently we reviewed a proposal that talked about “Ethos” and offered optional services called “External Validation” and “External Quarterlies” but completely failed to explain what “External Validation” and “External Quarterlies” were. We also don’t really care about “Ethos” because it has nothing to do with the business offering. Moreover, this same proposal absolutely failed to define methodology and did not provide any insight into how testing would be done. The pricing section was simply a single line item with a dollar value, it wasn’t itemized. Sure the document […]

How to find a genuine Penetration Testing firm

There’s been a theme of dishonesty and thievery in the Penetration Testing industry for as long as we can remember.  Much in the same way that merchants sold “snake-oil” as a cure-all for what ails you, Penetration Testing vendors sell one type of service and brand it as another thus providing little more than a false sense of security.  They do this by exploiting their customers lack of expertise about penetration testing and make off like bandits.  We’re going to change the game; we’re going to tell you the truth.

Last week we had a new financial services customer approach us.  They’d already received three proposals from three other well-known and trusted Penetration Testing vendors. When we began to scope their engagement we quickly realized that the IP addresses that they’d been providing were wrong.  Instead of belonging to them they belonged an e-commerce business that sold beer-making products!  How did we catch this when the other vendors didn’t?  Simple, we actually take the time to scope our engagements carefully because we deliver genuine Penetration Testing services.

Most other penetration testing vendors do what is called count based pricing which we think should be a major red-flag to anyone.  Count based pricing simply says that you will pay X dollars per IP address for Y IP addresses. If you tell most vendors that you have 10 IP addresses they’ll come back and quote you at around $5,000.00 for a Penetration Test ($500.00 per IP). That type of pricing is not only arbitrary but is fraught with serious problems. Moreover, it’s a solid indicator that services are going to be very poor quality.
Scenario 1: The Overcharge (Too much for too little)
If you have 10 IP addresses but […]

The 3 ways we owned you in 2012

Here are the top 3 risks that we leveraged to penetrate into our customers’ networks in 2012. Each of these has been used to affect an irrecoverable infrastructure compromise during multiple engagements across a range of different customers. We flag a compromise “irrecoverable” when we’ve successfully taken administrative control over 60% or more of the network-connected assets. You’ll notice that these risks are more human-oriented than they are technology-oriented, thus demonstrating that your people are your greatest risk. While we certainly do focus on technological risks, they don’t fall into the top three categories.

The general methodology that we follow to achieve an irrecoverable infrastructure compromise is depicted below at a high-level.

Gain entry via a single point (one of the 3 referenced below)
Install custom backdoor (RADON our safe, undetectable, home-grown pseudo-malware)
Identify and penetrate the domain controller (surprisingly easy in most cases)
Extract and crack the passwords (we have pretty rainbows and access to this GPU cracker)
Propagate the attack to the rest of the network (Distributed Metastasis)

 
Social Engineering
Social Engineering is the art of manipulating people into divulging information or performing actions usually for the purpose of gaining access to a computer system or network connected resource. It is similar to fraud, but the attacker very rarely comes face-to-face with his or her victims. Today, Social Engineering is used to help facilitate the delivery of technological attacks like the planting of malware, spy devices, etc.

During an engagement in 2012, Netragard used Social Engineering to execute an irrecoverable infrastructure compromise against one of its healthcare customers. This was done through a job opportunity that was posted on our customers website. Specifically, our customer was looking to hire a Web Application Developer that understood how to design secure applications. We built an irresistible resume and established fake references, which quickly landed us an […]

Quality Penetration Testing by Netragard

The purpose of Penetration Testing is to identify the presence of points where an external entity can make its way into or through a protected entity. Penetration Testing is not unique to IT security and is used across a wide variety of different industries.  For example, Penetration Tests are used to assess the effectiveness of body armor.  This is done by exposing the armor to different munitions that represent the real threat. If a projectile penetrates the armor then the armor is revised and improved upon until it can endure the threat.

Network Penetration Testing is a class of Penetration Testing that applies to Information Technology. The purpose of Network Penetration Testing is to identify the presence of points where a threat (defined by the hacker) can align with existing risks to achieve penetration. The accurate identification of these points allows for remediation.

Successful penetration by a malicious hacker can result in the compromise of data with respect to Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability (“CIA”).  In order to ensure that a Network Penetration Test provides an accurate measure of risk (risk = probability x impact) the test must be delivered at a threat level that is slightly elevated from that which is likely to be faced in the real world. Testing at a lower than realistic threat level would be akin to testing a bulletproof vest with a squirt gun.

Threat levels can be adjusted by adding or removing attack classes. These attack classes are organized under three top-level categories, which are Network Attacks, Social Attacks, and Physical Attacks.  Each of the top-level categories can operate in a standalone configuration or can be used to augment the other.  For example, Network Penetration Testing with Social Engineering creates a […]

Netragard’s thoughts on Pentesting IPv6 vs IPv4

We’ve heard a bit of “noise” about how IPv6 may impact network penetration testing and how networks may or may not be more secure because of IPv6.  Lets be clear, anyone telling you that IPv6 makes penetration testing harder doesn’t understand the first thing about real penetration testing.

Whats the point of IPv6?

IPv6 was designed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (“IETF”) to address the issue of IPv4 address space exhaustion.  IPv6 uses a 128-bit address space while IPv4 is only 32 bits.  This means that there are 2128 possible addresses with IPv6, which is far more than the 232 addresses available with IPv4.  This means that there are going to be many more potential targets for a penetration tester to focus on when IPv6 becomes the norm.

What about increased security with IPv6?

The IPv6 specification mandates support for the Internet Protocol Security (“IPSec”) protocol suite, which is designed to secure IP communications by authenticating and encrypting each IP Packet. IPSec operates at the Internet Layer of the Internet Protocol suite and so differs from other security systems like the Secure Socket Layer, which operates at the application layer. This is the only significant security enhancement that IPv6 brings to the table and even this has little to no impact on penetration testing.

What some penetration testers are saying about IPv6.

Some penetration testers argue that IPv6 will make the job of a penetration testing more difficult because of the massive increase in potential targets. They claim that the massive increase in potential targets will make the process of discovering live targets impossibly time consuming. They argue that scanning each port/host in an entire IPv6 range could take as long as 13,800,523,054,961,500,000 years.  But why the […]

Security Vulnerability Penetration Assessment Test?

Our philosophy here at Netragard is that security-testing services must produce a threat that is at least equal to the threat that our customers are likely to face in the real world. If we test our customers at a lesser threat level and a higher-level threat attempts to align with their risks, then they will likely suffer a compromise. If they do suffer a compromise, then the money that they spent on testing services might as well be added to the cost in damages that result from the breach.This is akin to how armor is tested. Armor is designed to protect something from a specific threat. In order to be effective, the armor is exposed to a level of threat that is slightly higher than what it will likely face in the real world. If the armor is penetrated during testing, it is enhanced and hardened until the threat cannot defeat the armor. If armor is penetrated in battle then there are casualties. That class of testing is called Penetration Testing and the level of threat produced has a very significant impact on test quality and results.What is particularly scary is that many of the security vendors who offer Penetration Testing services either don’t know what Penetration Testing is or don’t know the definitions for the terms. Many security vendors confuse Penetration Testing with Vulnerability Assessments and that confusion translates to the customer. The terms are not interchangeable and they do not define methodology, they only define testing class. So before we can explain service quality and threat, we must first properly define services.Based on the English dictionary the word “Vulnerability” is best defined as susceptibility to harm or attack. Being vulnerable is […]

REVERSE(noitcejnI LQS dnilB) Bank Hacking

Earlier this year we were hired to perform an Overt Web Application Penetration Test for one of our banking customers (did you click that?).This customer is a reoccurring customer and so we know that they have Web Application Firewalls and Network Intrusion Prevention Systems in play.We also know that they are very security savvy and that they respond to attacks promptly and appropriately.

Because this test was Overt in nature (non-stealth) we began testing by configuring Acunetix to use burpsuite-pro as a proxy.Then we ran an automated Web Application Vulnerability Scan with Acunetix and watched the scan populate burpsuite-pro with information.While the scan results were mostly fruitless we were able to pick up with manual testing and burpsuite-pro.
While the automated scans didn’t find anything our manual testing identified an interesting Blind SQL Injection Vulnerability.This blind SQL Injection vulnerability was the only vulnerability that we discovered that had any real potential.
It’s important understand to the difference between standard SQL Injection Vulnerabilities and Blind SQL Injection Vulnerabilities.A standard SQL Injection Vulnerability will return useful error information to the attacker and usually display that information in the attackers web browser.That information helps the attacker debug and refine the attack.Blind SQL Injection Vulnerabilities return nothing, making them much more difficult to exploit.
Since the target Web Application was protected by two different Intrusion Prevention Technologies, and since the vulnerability was a Blind SQL Injection Vulnerability, we knew that exploitation wasn’t going to be easy.To be successful we’d first need to defeat the Network Intrusion Prevention System and then the Web Application Firewall.
Defeating Network Intrusion Prevention Systems is usually fairly easy.The key is to find an attack vector that the Network Intrusion Prevention System can’t monitor.In this case (like most cases) […]

Social Engineering — Its Nothing New

With all the recent hype about Social Engineering we figured that we’d chime in and tell people what’s really going on. The fact is that Social Engineering is nothing more than a Confidence Trick being carried out by a Con Artist. The only difference between the term Social Engineering and Confidence Trick is that Social Engineering is predominately used with relation to technology. So what is it really? Social Engineering is the act of exploiting a person’s natural tendency to trust another person or entity. Because the vulnerability exists within people, there is no truly effective method for remediation. That is not to say that you cannot protect your sensitive data, but it is to say that you cannot always prevent your people or even yourself from being successfully conned. The core ingredients required to perform a successful confidence trick are no different today then they were before the advent of the Internet. The con artist must have the victim’s trust, and then trick the victim into performing an action or divulging information. The Internet certainly didn’t create the risk but it does make it easier for the threat to align with the risk. Before the advent of the Internet the con artist (threat) needed to contact the victim (risk) via telephone, in person, via snail mail, etc. Once contact was made a good story needed to be put into place and the victim’s trust needed to be earned. That process could take months or even years and even then success isn’t guaranteed. The advent of the Internet provided the threat with many more avenues’ through which it could successfully align with the risk. Specifically, the Internet enables the threat to […]

ROI of good security.

The cost of good security is a fraction of the cost of damages that usually result from a single successful compromise. When you choose the inexpensive security vendor, you are getting what you pay for. If you are looking for a check in the box instead of good security services, then maybe you should re-evaluate your thinking because you might be creating a negative Return on Investment.Usually a check in the box means that you comply with some sort of regulation, but that doesn’t mean that you are actually secure. As a matter of fact, almost all networks that contain credit card information and are successfully hacked are PCI compliant (a real example). That goes to show that compliance doesn’t protect you from hackers, it only protects you from auditors and the fines that they can impose. Whats more is that those fines are only a small fraction of the cost of the damages that can be caused by a single successful hack.When a computer system is hacked, the hacker doesn’t stop at one computer. Standard hacker practice is to perform Distributed Metastasis and propagate the penetration throughout the rest of the network. This means that within a matter of minutes the hacker will likely have control over the most or all of the critical aspects of your IT infrastructure and will also have access to your sensitive data. At that point you’ve lost the battle… but you were compliant, you paid for the scan and now you’ve got a negative Return on that Investment (“ROI”).So what are the damages? Its actually impossible to determine the exact cost in damages that result from […]

Need a Penetration Testing Quote?Get A Quote