Bruce Schneier

/Bruce Schneier

Enemy of the state

A case study in Penetration Testing

We haven’t been blogging as much as usual largely because we’ve been busy hacking things.   So, we figured that we’d make it up to our readers by posting an article about one of our recent engagements. This is a story about how we covertly breached a highly sensitive network during the delivery of a Platinum level Penetration Test.

First, we should make clear that while this story is technically accurate certain aspects have been altered to protect our customer’s identity and security. In this case we can’t even tell you if this was for a private or public sector customer. At no point will ever write an article that would put any of our customers at risk. For the sake of intrigue lets call this customer Group X.

The engagement was designed to produce a level of threat that would exceeded that which Group X was likely to face in reality. In this case Group X was worried about specific foreign countries breaching their networks. Their concern was not based on any particular threat but instead based on trends and what we agreed was reasonable threat intelligence.   […]

Selling zero-day’s doesn’t increase your risk, here’s why.

The zero-day exploit market is secretive. People as a whole tend to fear what they don’t understand and substitute fact with speculation.  While very few facts about the zero-day exploit market are publicly available, there are many facts about zero-days that are available.  When those facts are studied it becomes clear that the legitimate zero-day exploit market presents an immeasurably small risk (if any), especially when viewed in contrast with known risks.

Many news outlets, technical reporters, freedom of information supporters, and even security experts have used the zero-day exploit market to generate Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).  While the concept of a zero-day exploit seems ominous reality is actually far less menacing.  People should be significantly more worried about vulnerabilities that exist in public domain than those that are zero-day.  The misrepresentations about the zero-day market create a dangerous distraction from the very real issues at hand.

One of the most common misrepresentations is that the zero-day exploit market plays a major role in the creation of malware and malware’s ability to spread.  Not only is this categorically untrue but the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIRv11) provides clear statistics that show that […]

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